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Leadership

Thoughts and insights on how to be a better leader.

Managing Your Deposits and Withdrawals

By Leadership
In terms of financial health, the equation is fairly simple: don't take out more than you put in. Unless you're the federal government, most banks require you to have the money in your account before you can spend it. That's one reason why credit card debt is so high - it's easier to charge it now and pay later than to pay for it now. Unfortunately, what we end paying later is much greater than the original cost. When our girls entered high school, we created checking accounts for them. The bank representative strongly encouraged "overdraft" protection. Why? Because teenagers are likely to spend more than they have in their account. The maturing process involves learning to make responsible decisions. To put it another way, immature people continue to make irresponsible decisions. While this basic math makes sense financially, it also translates to other areas of our lives. Learning to...
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Weariness

By Leadership
If we've learned anything over the last fourteen months, it’s this: Not much is really stable in our world. Our health can improve or decline, with or without the coronavirus. Our savings and investments can go up or down, or go away. Even the most secure, bolted-down belief will feel a tremor every now and then. I'm often asked, “Ken, what has been your biggest test throughout these fourteen months?" It's hard to single out a specific, unique event or moment. What often appears to be a single, solitary moment rarely happens in isolation. Even in those cases that appear to be standalone events, you will often find there are things building up to it and the aftermath that follows. So, I believe the biggest test I've faced -- and I'm not alone -- is not one single test but the stacking of multiple tests over a compressed period of...
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Same House, New Perspective

By Leadership
It happened to me. From the moment I came home from the hospital as a newborn baby until I left for college, I slept in the same bedroom. It was my room. Baseball cards, a few books, and other "valuables" were spread across my dresser. A Nerf hoop was clipped to the back of my door. The same two posters hung on my closet all throughout high school - John McEnroe and Peter Frampton. Then I left for college in the fall of 1987, and when I returned for Christmas break, it was different. Technically, it was still my bedroom because dad had left my bed in there. The posters were still there. But he had moved in a desk with an office chair, a filing cabinet and a phone, and a television. He had converted my bedroom into a home office. I had mixed feelings about it. While I...
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The World We Have and the World We Want to Have

By Church, Leadership
Like many other things, I did not choose to be a Cubs fan. It chose me. Had I been born in Los Angeles or New York City, there's a good chance I would have been a life-long Dodgers or Yankees fan. But, by the mercy of God, I arrived at St. Francis Hospital on a November's day in Peoria, IL, and didn't leave again until I went away to college. I had other childhood friends, even a few of my own brothers -- born at the same hospital -- who became (of all things) Cardinal fans! To be fair, Central Illinois is sort of the baseball version of the Mason-Dixon line in Illinois. Some become Cubs fans, others grope in the darkness. As I look back over the factors that shaped my life, I have to admit I had zero control over many of them: I was born in 1969...
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Good Times Don’t Always Produce Good Societies

By Leadership
Passing along a good read ... ********************* In Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging, Sebastian Junger argues that modern society robs us of the solidarity we need to thrive. Unfortunately, he writes, “The beauty and the tragedy of the modern world is that it eliminates many situations that require people to demonstrate commitment to the collective good.” As life becomes safer, it is easier for us to live detached lives. We can meet all of our needs in relative isolation, which prevents us from building a strong connection to a common purpose. In our normal day to day, we rarely need to show courage, turn to our communities for help, or make sacrifices for the sake of others. Read the whole article: https://fs.blog/2020/06/crisis/ ********************* Experience and Background 25+ years of senior leadership experience masters in management and leadership presenter at the WFX National Conference former president, Church Planters of the Rockies...
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