Category

Preaching

Tips, ideas, articles, and ruminations about the art and craft of preaching.

Reframing Adversity (video)

By Church, Preaching
At some point in life, everyone will face a difficulty. It might be an illness, unemployment, or the break-up of a family. This raises an important question: How do we rise above difficult circumstances? It might surprise you, but researchers who study resilient people agree with Jesus: We must have something larger than our circumstances that we are living for. That’s the premise behind our passage in Philippians 1. The Apostle Paul is writing to a church he helped start – and he’s writing from prison. He’s literally chained to a Roman soldier! He might be in prison but that hasn’t changed his perspective. How is that possible? Watch more videos at the Mountainview YouTube channel. Looking for a Speaking Coach? The most successful people are not always the smartest people. But they have one thing in common: they communicate well. I'd love to help you become a better communicator....
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Spiritual Expectations (video)

By Church, Preaching
Growth in the natural world is all about looking forward. A sapling becomes a large oak tree by growing slowly over time. An infant grows into a child, who eventually becomes an adult. Hope works in the same way – it looks forward. When a person has hope, they can imagine a better future. It is hope that allows you to look past your present circumstances and see through faith a better future. Without hope, a person feels stuck. A spiritually vibrant life is the result of faith-filled anticipation. Watch more videos at the Mountainview YouTube channel. Looking for a Speaking Coach? The most successful people are not always the smartest people. But they have one thing in common: they communicate well. I'd love to help you become a better communicator. Click here. My Background 25+ years of senior leadership experience church planter with Stadia former former president, Church Planters...
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Who You Are and How You Appear

By Leadership, Preaching
While we live in a world of splinters and contradictions, we are hard-wired for connections. Literally. Our brains are designed to make connections, find patterns, and are troubled by dissonance. This is why understanding the power of nonverbal communication is vital. Our words say, "I'm happy" but our face tells a different story. I tell my wife, "I'm not upset" but my eyebrows are narrowed and I'm squinting at her through beady eyes! These mixed signals create red flags within our brains. This is why the most effective leaders, communicators, parents, and presenters are actively engaged in developing better self-awareness. For me to have good self-awareness, I must understand two things: Who I am How I appear to others Simply doing introspection isn't enough. It's important - even necessary. But knowing yourself better is only half of the equation. Let's say through introspection I discover that my tone of voice...
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Minimize Distractions for Better Communication

By Leadership, Preaching
Amy Boone of Ethos3 has an excellent article entitled, "How to Overcome Presentation Distractions." It's about how to minimize noise to improve the effectiveness of your presentations. One of the first things that struck me was research from the University of California Irvine. It found that it takes an average of 23 minutes and 15 seconds to regain attention and focus after encountering a distraction. Holy cow! If you're making a 30 minute presentation, any distraction might cost you the full impact of your message. The article goes on to point out two types of "noise" -- or distractions. As presenters, we have more control over one than the other. In broad strokes, there is external and internal noise. External noise consists of: Environment - this is the physical room and the various elements in it (phones, alarms, beeps, burps) Message - this refers to unnecessary (or hard-to-understand) jargon Presentation...
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Connection Not Perfection

By Leadership, Preaching
From an early age I learned I enjoyed public speaking. I don't remember the first time I stood in front of a group and gave a presentation. It might have been "show and tell" in kindergarten. As a kid growing up in a local church, it could have been reading scripture or praying during midweek services. During my teen years, I began participating on the speech team in high school and delivered my first sermon on a Sunday evening. Over the years, I've tried to be diligent about honing my craft.  As a communicator, I realize I haven't communicated if all I have done is transmit information. When the audience understands the information and knows how to apply it ... then I've communicated. Just recently, I was reading an excellent blog post by Stephanie Scotti, author of Talk on Water. In it she writes about foundational beliefs every effective communicator...
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