for or with

By April 20, 2012Leadership

Perry Noble says the number one sign of an insecure leader is that they see people as working for them and not with them.  (Read the full list here).

These two small words (a combined seven letters, average of 3.5 letters per word) reflect a large difference in attitude.  This difference not only affects the leader’s style but how the people respond to their leadership.

I’ve told my children, “There’s a difference between ‘I’ve got to do something’ and ‘I get to do something.'”

When you’ve got to do something, it’s often viewed as a burden.  You do it because you are obligated or fearful of what will happen if you don’t do it.

When you get to do something, it’s act of passion or purpose.  You don’t watch the clock or groan about it.

As a leader, if you view people as working for you it is likely they will perceive their tasks as things they’ve got to do.  Why?  Because they have got to do this for you.

If you see people as working with you, it’s likely you will spend the time to learn what motivates them.  You will have them saying, “I get to do this.”

What do you think?