mobility

By February 16, 2011Leadership

For the past week or so my right hip has been hurting – to the point that it is hard to get in/out of bed and move in certain directions.  Sitting for long periods of time means standing up with a sharp pain and a stiff leg.  Jumping up and down is out of the question!

When the body is functioning normal, we take our mobility for granted.  Getting out of bed doesn’t require a strategy; you just do it. 

It’s amazing how vital mobility is to having an enjoyable afternoon or even a productive walk to the kitchen.

The part week has made me think about a different kind of mobility … the ability to quickly adapt your thinking and attitude to changing circumstances.  I’m not suggesting moral relativism – truth is truth regardless of our situation or circumstances.  But what about our perspective on disappointments?  Or how we handle challenges?  Or see opportunities?  Or view our potential?

When it comes to matters of attitude, many people are paralyzed by immobility.  They simply can’t (or won’t) move in a better direction or a different direction.

An immobile attitude may see an opportunity through the lens of a previous failure.  Fear of failure can stiffen mental joints.  Or, it’s also possible to be paralyzed by success.  Every new opportunity is seen as extension of what worked in the past.  New realities may not be considered.

A mobile attitude is a curious attitude.  It seeks to learn and explore.  It is willing to take action, even if it is a small step. 

Perhaps the worst part of mental immobility is that we may not know we suffer from it.  Unlike my right hip which sends a pain signal to my brain every time I move it, mental stiffness sends no immediate warning signal.  The absence of pain, however, is not necessarily an indication of health.

So, don’t take your mobility for granted.  Exercise your right to move.

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